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Booker Introduces Bill to Provide Funding for September 11th Memorial Sites

Gillibrand, Schumer, Menendez join effort to dedicate federal funding stream to maintaining sacred sites

June 28, 2018
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WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, U.S. Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ), along with Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and Robert Menendez (D-NJ) introduced a bill that would establish a federal grant program to help support the memorials dedicated to commemorating the September 11th, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States.  The September 11th National Memorials Act creates a funding stream to support the security, maintenance and successful operations of The World Trade Center site, the United 93 Memorial, and the Pentagon Memorial.

“These memorial sites are sacred ground where Americans come to remember, reflect, and pay their respects ,” Sen. Booker said. “We must never forget the horror of that terrible day, the lives that were lost, and the people whose lives were forever changed. That’s why it’s incumbent on us to keep these sites secure and accessible to all Americans for generations to come.”

“The terrorist attacks of September 11th remain a vivid memory for all of us who saw a bright day turn into a living nightmare. As we remember those who perished on that dreadful day, we must back up our pledge to never forget with real action in support of the memorials erected in their honor,” said Sen. Menendez. “I’m proud to join Senator Booker to introduce legislation that will help keep our 9/11 memorials running smoothly and securely for every American who wishes to honor the memories of the mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters, friends and neighbors we lost that day.”

 

The World Trade Center site hosts over six million visitors each year; the United 93 Memorial and Pentagon Memorial each receive several hundred thousand. Each site runs important educational programs that provide opportunities for students to learn about the tragic events of September 11th. Ongoing security and maintenance needs remain top concerns deserving of federal support.

Specifically, the September 11th National Memorials Act would:

  • Authorize up to $25 million in annual funding to ensure the security, maintenance, and successful operations and educational programs at the memorials established to commemorate the events of September 11, 2001

  • Support continuing important policies such as free admission to all facilities for active and retired members of the military, registered first responders to the attacks of September 11, 2001, and family members of victims of the attacks of September 11, 2001

  • Support dedicated free admission hours for the general public at least once a week

  • Require grant recipients to provide to the Department of Interior and the public comprehensive financial disclosure information to ensure careful stewardship of taxpayer dollars

This is the first time such legislation has been introduced in the Senate. A similar bill, introduced by Rep. Tom MacArthur (R-NJ), was passed by the US House in 2016.

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